Thursday September 18, 2014




Swedish prime minister says there is 'talk' Spain may need almost $100 billion in rescue loans


A man buys fish in a market in Barcelona, Spain, Saturday June 9 2012. Spain will ask for a bank bailout from the eurozone, becoming the fourth and largest country to seek help since the single currency bloc's debt crisis erupted. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

STOCKHOLM - Sweden's prime minister says there is widespread European agreement that Spain needs to ask for outside help to try to prop up its ailing economy and that "there is talk" of a bailout package of up to 80 billion ($99.74 billion).

Fredrik Reinfeldt, whose country is not part of the eurozone, spoke with national broadcaster Swedish Radio ahead of an emergency conference call between European finance ministers Saturday.

He said the situation in the southern European country "is serious" and "that in reality we're talking about one of the greatest financial rescue operations the world has seen."

A report from the International Monetary Fund on Saturday estimated Spanish banks need a recapitalization injection of at least 40 billion ($50 billion), but Reinfeldt says "there's talk about up to 80 billion."


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