Stackhouse Soapbox - Trouble at the Gallagher Centre

One of the latest examples of disrespect in our society was on display at the Yorkton Terriers game on Friday night when a young man, who appeared to be in his late 20s (not a kid), was approached by an elderly security official from the Gallagher Centre. The young man was standing for the national anthem, but he had a hat on and a hood on over top of his hat. The security official politely asked him to remove his headwear during the anthem and the young man shot him a condescending grin and informed him he would not be removing his headwear. I know some of you reading this will say that’s why our veterans served. For our right to disrespect the flag when we want to. But, that’s not at all how I view it. It’s situations like that where I wish we lived in a different country. One where that young man would not have been asked to remove what he had on his head.  But, rather his entire body would have been removed from the game and maybe he’s never seen again. Extreme, sure. But, just take your hat off.

While on the topic of the Gallagher Centre, am I the only person who has trouble with the ATMs?  Sometimes they don’t respond, sometimes they take an eternity to dispense the cash. Now, I realize it could be that the bank just needs a bit more time to determine whether or not I actually have a balance; but can we get faster machines if they are going to gouge you $2-$3 per transaction? The least we could have is fast service while they make off with charging you a fee to take money that belongs to you anyway.

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In Quebec, farmers are pressing the Trudeau government to ensure they get propane shipments while 3200 CN workers are off on strike.  Yes, you read that correctly. There is no end to liberal hypocrisy. A province full of people who say there is no social license for pipelines and support a federal government that is focused on eliminating Canada’s dependence on fossil fuels, is in panic mode over having to find alternate means to sustain their livelihood. One farmer says, “Everything is still in the field. I’m also a grain elevator owner, so that means I dry corn for other farmers and they have to leave their crops in the field because I can’t dry their crops. That’s really stressful for them, for me, for our family, for everybody.” The farmer goes on to say less corn would mean less feed for animals and less material for ethanol production and starch production, which have uses beyond food, such as in pharmaceutical manufacturing.  In typical Quebec form, they aren’t asking the government to force anyone back to work. They just want to make sure what few trains are moving are moving to Quebec. Because, you know, they are more important than the rest of us. After all, they are the only province that farms.

Jason Kenney appeared at the Grey Cup this weekend with a hoodie bearing the message he supports the oil and gas industry.  Media outlets in eastern Canada are upset that Kenney would ‘politicize’ the Grey Cup and are reporting he was booed. He was not booed. He was cheered. And, standing up for these crucial resources that keep so many Albertans employed on a national scale for the entire country to see is the responsible thing to do. Having said that, this is where I tend to veer off the beaten path when it comes to the oil and gas sector. Part of the issue here is corporate greed. I’m all for supporting industries that employ Canadians, but I’m not alright beating the drum without pointing out there are a lot of people wearing suits who make gobs of money that take advantage of the general public’s need of oil and gas. The simplest example I have is that it used to be there was a fairly close correlation between the price of oil per barrel and the price of gas at the pumps in cents. Which is to say, if oil is $60 a barrel, gas was $0.60 per litre. There is no argument that doesn’t bring me great skepticism other than your standard greed and demand as to why this is no longer the case.

Trudeau unveiled his new cabinet last week and if it wasn’t already evident he is trolling the west then it became crystal clear with some of his appointments. First of all, he named Jim Carr to a special position outside of cabinet in which Carr is tasked with rebuilding relations with western Canada. Carr, however, was recently diagnosed with a form of blood cancer. What kind of a human being is going to be critical of Carr while he fights the battle of his life? Can Carr even be the representative needed here? Frat boy friend Seamus O’Regan is the new Natural Resources Minister. O’Regan is, widely, deemed by even friendly Liberal media to be one of the most incompetent politicans within Trudeau’s inner circle and he gets a title that is important to those of us who live on the Prairies. To top it all off, Mona Fortier has been named head of a new department called Middle Class Prosperity.  Fortier will be paid the upper middle class salary of $264,000 per year. But, the thing I’m more interested in pointing out is that Fortier saved Trudeau’s skin this Spring when she was one of six Liberal MPs that voted to shut down investigation of Trudeau’s office in the SNC Lavalin affair. She’s rewarded with a portfolio she can’t even describe, other than to say she feels parents with kids in hockey are middle class people.  Great.


Nice people this week:  Kent Esplin, Kenda Kohut, Kendoll Rockthunder, Jack Verstraete, and Brad Bohn.

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